Research on the Statues of Five Great Akasagarbha in To-ji Temple, Kyoto

Many rare Buddhist sculptures made of wood and dating from the Tang and Sung dynasties have been brought to Japan from China. Such works are survived in detail and the results are published as basic reference for research. The statues of the Five Great Akasagarbha belonging to Kanchi-in, To-ji Temple in Kyoto are generally considered to have been brought to Japan in the 9th centiry. The details survey being carried out regarding to form and structure of these five statues should provide a basis for further development in the research of when and where they were made and the history of Buddhist faith in Japan.

Kongo-Kokuzo Bosatsu, one of the Five Great Akasagarbha, wood, Chinese Tang Dynasty, 9th century
To-ji Temple, Kyoto

The five statues are each seated on pedestals in the form of a lion, elephant, horse, peacock, and Garuda.


Hokkai-Kokuzo Bosatsu, one of the Five Great Akasagarbha, wood, Chinese Tang Dynasty, 9th century
To-ji Temple, Kyoto

The decoration on the chest was made of a paste and then stuck onto the wooden atatue. The crown is a later addition.


Renge-Kokuzo Bosatsu, one of the Five Great Akasagarbha, wood, Chinese Tang Dynasty, 9th century
To-ji Temple, Kyoto

The structure was clarified by the investigation done by X-ray photos.

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