Training of Afghan and Iraqi specialists

Practicing peeling off remains (Shizuoka Prefectural Institute for Buried Cultural Properties)
Practicing conservation of metal relics (Nara National Research Institute for Cultural Properties)

 Funded by grants from the Institute and UNESCO/Japanese Funds-in-Trust, the Japan Center for International Cooperation in Conservation invited Afghan and Iraqi specialists engaged in the conservation of cultural heritage and archaeology, and conducted training for capacity development and transfer of techniques.
 Two archaeology specialists from Afghanistan were invited from the Institute of Archaeology in Kabul: Mr. Ketab Khan Faizy and Mr. Ruhullah Ahumadozai. They received training in archaeology for 5 months, during which time they participated in on-site excavation and studied the methods for excavation and measuring of sites and objects not only at the National Research Institute for Cultural Properties, Tokyo, but also with the cooperation of such organizations as the Tokyo Metropolitan Buried Cultural Property Research Center, Nagareyama City Board of Education and the Nara National Research Institute for Cultural Properties.
 Two Iraqi conservator were invited from the Iraq National Museum: Ms. Buthainah M. Abdulhussein, Director of the Central Laboratory of Restoration and Conservation of Antiquities, and Mr. Thmar R. Abuduallah, a conservator. The two received 6 months of training from July to December 2008 on conservation, mainly of wooden artifacts, as well as practical training to acquire relevant conservation techniques. This project was conducted with the cooperation of various domestic institutions for conservation, such as the Nara National Research Institute for Cultural Properties, the Shizuoka Research Institute for Buried Cultural Heritage and the Kyushu National Museum. The trainees practiced conservation of wooden objects at the National Research Institute for Cultural Properties, Tokyo and of metal objects at the Nara National Research Institute for Cultural Properties. They further learned basic scientific investigation methods for wooden materials at the Shizuoka Research Institute for Buried Cultural Heritage and about the latest analysis devices including 3-dimensional CT scanners at the Kyushu National Museum.
 The Japan Center for International Cooperation in Conservation intends to continue to assist in the capacity development of specialists who are engaged in the conservation of cultural heritage in Afghanistan and Iraq through similar training courses.

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